I just wanted to pass a quick note of thanks to everyone for all of your help with regards to the recent moves. These finished yesterday, with everyone all moved in and working away without any major hiccups. Wayne & Brian did a fantastic job for us, particularly in the heat that we’ve had this week, and I’ve had nothing but the highest of praise for all their hard work and especially patience when dealing with the staff…
 

Big numbers at The Economist

Founded in 1843, The Economist is the leading source of analysis on international business and world affairs. Burton & Smith were chosen to move their London based staff from Red Lion Square and St James’s Street into a new corporate HQ in Canary Wharf. This relocation of around 450 staff had to be completed during just one weekend so that business could continue as normal on the following Monday morning. Lee Peters and Michael Channing mapped out the complex pattern of integrated tasks over 10 weeks of planning, liaising closely with Economist staff to forsee any potential problem. The move would demand continuous 24 hour shifts for the crews of Move Managers, IT engineers, joiners, packers and porters.

Before the main move, 155 framed pictures were wrapped, crated and taken into our storage facility, along with with 449 metres of filing (that’s more than the length of four football pitches). During the move itself, multiple servers and 450 work stations were de-commissioned and re-commissioned by our specialist IT teams. No staff member was left without a workstation and not one of the 2,450 crates that were used went astray. As a follow-up exercise, we returned to clear the redundant furniture and equipment from both of the old sites. Items were dismantled and delivered for recycling to our partners, Azcom Business Solutions. Azcom recondition office equipment for supply back to the public and private sectors and offer concessions and donations to local charities, schools and community groups. Our target is to recycle 94% of the items that are collected.

    265 Economist    

10 weeks of planning

450 work stations

2,450 crates

155 pictures wrapped

449 linear metres of files